Fashion Sense: NYFW Recap

Stunning, brilliant and magical. Three words to describe New York Fashion Week 2017. Featured designers put blood, sweat and tears (maybe literally) into their productions and they could not have been more extravagent. From the launch of Gemy Maalouf’s collection to Vivienne Tam, Vivienne Hu, Leanne Marshall & Nicole Miller, we witnessed true talent first hand and learned of trends arriving in Fall 2017. We have to admit, we can NOT wait!

Vivienne Hu 
This collection captured more of the “Nonchalant Tomboy” trend vibing throughout fashion week. Our favorite looks include a clean, minimalist line and we sure can’t forget about the layers! Lots and lots of layers; pure brilliance.

Vivienne Hu

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Nicole Miller
The designer channeled her inner NYC grunge for this collection and we loved it! Skulls, leather and chains were frequently seen on the runway with dark eye makeup and a bright red lip. Again, we can’t forget about those layering pieces!

Nicole MillerImage Via 

Vivienne Tam
While Nicole Miller channeled her inner NYC grunge, Vivienne went with a Hong Kong nightlife scene for her inspiration. The vibe of the show was everything, upbeat and fierce with a feministic touch. From bold patterns to bombers and sequence, the collection captured every bit of the urban culture. Check out those prints!

Vivienne Tam

Vivienne Tam

Vivienne Tam

Images Via

Gemy Maalouf
This collection screams romance! Gemy mastered the evening gown aesthetic for her fashion week launch party. Structured tailored peices, lace detail and ruffles made up this perfectly elegant group. Did we mention it was at the Bowery Hotel?

Gemy MaaloufGemy MaaloufGemy Maalouf

Leanne Marshall
Leanne Marshall gave her collection the feminist touch with monochromatic looks, varying necklines, soft silk and textured lace. The models sported neutral makeup, updos, red lips and a gorgeous statemenet earring.

Leanne Marshall

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Boss Lady: Samantha Hahn

Boss Lady is a series that shares personal insights from creative women in business. This week we chat with Samantha Hahn, a New York-based illustrator, author and the creative director for an amazing new book box subscription company called quarterlane. Samantha takes us through the daily hustle of playing many roles in this industry and shares with us her passion for success. 

Samantha Hahn
1. Tell us a little bit about yourself and your career. 
I’m a Brooklyn based creative director, illustrator and author. I work with a range of clients such as: quarterlane, the Paris Review, Vogue Japan, Lela Rose, Marie Claire, Chronicle Books and Apartment Therapy.

2. What is a typical work day like for you?
It really varies. I often have a couple of illustration projects going at once and I’m creative director at quarterlane so I’m often sending off interview questions to authors, planning lifestyle photoshoots or having plotting and planning sessions with founder Elizabeth Lane about our upcoming season.

3.  Can you explain your involvement with quarterlane books and how you got involved? 
I came on shortly before the launch to do some illustrations. I wound up really connecting with Elizabeth the founder, who is the amazing book curator as well. I wound up advising on the site and brand visuals and staying on as creative director along with Courtney Peterson. I spearheaded the launch of an editorial sister site called The Edit where we conduct author interviews, lifestyle features, book reviews and where we simply celebrate our love of reading and reading culture. It’s honestly the most fun project I’ve had in a long time. I really love collaborating with Elizabeth and being part of such a brilliant brand as it rapidly grows. My role has become nebulous. It’s not just simply visuals. If I have an idea I pitch it. We have a really natural, humanistic and organic way of working together which I love.

Samantha Hahn- quarterlanebooks
4. Out of all of the hats you wear, whether it be illustrating, publishing, writing, etc. what is your favorite role? 
That’s a hard question and it varies from day to day depending on what I’m working on. Sometimes at the start of fashion week I’m so excited to illustrate shows but by the end I want to use a different part of my brain, so working on quarterlane feels like heaven. Then a publisher will reach out with an amazing project to create a set of notecards for The Smithsonian of famous gems and I’m all excited to put my brush to the paper again. I love coming up with concepts for lookbooks and have recently had the pleasure of creative directing some for people whose work I’ve long admired. My main passion is collaborating with people and companies I admire. At the end of the day, that’s what I thrive on.

5.  What social media platform has been your biggest form of success for marketing yourself and quarterlane books? 
For myself I would say Instagram. I don’t have a ton of followers but my quality of followers is good. A lot of editors and art directors and brands I work with follow me there so it’s a nice way to showcase what I’m working on or what’s come to fruition. I run quarterlane’s Pinterest which is still pretty new but is growing all the time.  I love curating images that speak to the visual mood and tone of quarterlane. The Edit is my main focus though. There’s an endlessly fascinating stream of people and books to showcase and it’s just thrilling.

6. When it comes to building a brand, what is an important lesson that you have learned? 
I think having a clear vision of who you are speaking to is essential. It can be a group of people but picture the brand as a lecture that you are sending a flyer out about and see who would file into the auditorium to listen. That’s your audience.

Samantha Hahn

7. Your illustrations are beautiful and full of variety, is there a specific subject that you enjoy drawing the most?
I love painting the female form. I do this mainly through fashion illustration. It’s just an opportunity to celebrate movement, gesture, texture and color.

8. Are you currently working on any of your own books at the moment to publish? 
Gosh no! I did 2 and that’s enough for me at least for the foreseeable future. Doing a book takes tremendous bandwidth and emotional, intellectual and creative energy. As aforementioned I thrive on collaborating and doing a variety of projects and I feel being the sole author of a book just sucks too much out of me and isn’t the platform I’m most excited about. I’m happy to do other people’s book covers though and who knows, maybe someday I will get an idea that I just can’t imagine not publishing. It could happen but not for a couple of years at at least. I’m still recovering from my last book.

9. Who is a Boss Lady that inspires you?
Christene Barberich, global EIC of Refinery 29.

Behind the Boss Lady: Samantha Hahn’s Mood Board
Samantha Hahn

More on Samantha:
Instagram | Facebook | Website 

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Mill Talk with Rich Roat

This past Thursday evening, we were fortunate enough to hear from the co-founder of House Industries, Rich Roat, at The Mill’s latest “Mill Talk” in Wilmington. House Industries is world renowned for their eclectic font collections and American graphic designs. Their work can be found in collaborations made for Jimmy Kimmel, John Mayer, Hermès, and The New Yorker, to name a few.

Mill Talk

Roat spoke so passionately about the history of design and left us with some food for thought. There are 7 basic principles that he likes to follow to do his best and long-lasting work.

First, The Process Is The Inspiration.

House Industries

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He doesn’t like to get hung up, over-thinking about what to make for each client. He has a great team and together they get started on an idea and roll with it. They aren’t afraid to make changes and come up with crazy ideas in the middle of the process. Second, Bring Your Hobbies To Work. He is fortunate enough to be one of those people that LOVES what they do. Roat can be seen riding his custom bicycle engraved with the House Industries logo back and forth to the House studio in Yorklyn everyday. If that’s not bringing your hobbies to work, I don’t know what is.

Third, Sweat The Technique. You’re not crazy if you know how you want to do something and you won’t settle for anything less than just that. He stresses the techniques of his projects and ends up falling in love with each and every piece he makes. Fourth, Get Your Hands Dirty. Don’t be afraid to think outside the box. Don’t be afraid to use a material you have never used before. Jump in and give it your all, no matter how messy it might get. Fifth, Make New Friends. Roat probably mentioned 50 different names throughout his presentation, and you could tell they all meant a great deal to him. He even teared up talking about some members of his team that have been around since the company’s inception. He say’s that they’re so good at what they do, it makes him want to be better. And with each project he gets, he sees it as an opportunity to enrich his life with new ideas and new people.

Sixth, Tell It Like It Was. This one might sound like a bizarre sentiment, but is in fact very important. He was referring to the rich history of graphic design and even of the entire world. He uses not only new ideas, but old ideas and themes of the past to create his best work. Sure, the industry has grown and improved in many areas, but there’s something about simply picking up a paintbrush that no computer can ever truly mimic the control and beautiful texture of. Lastly, Embrace The Chaos. He says that life will come at you and certainly not in the order of his principles. It will be overwhelming at times and that’s when it’s most important to remember why you’re doing what you do. You love it. Work with the rushing water of the river you’re in; don’t try to fight it. In the end, you’ll have a piece of art so beautiful that it reflects every night’s sleep you lost over it, every drop of sweat and blood, and every tear. And that’s the kind of art that makes Roat say, “art can change the world”.

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Boss Lady: Maureen Petrosky

Boss Lady is a series that shares personal insights from creative women in business. This week we chat with Maureen Petrosky, author, television personality, chef, food stylist, and entertaining and lifestyle expert. Maureen shares with us her exciting career, her passion and inspiration for creating, and her advice to women pursuing dreams in entrepreneurship. 

Maureen Petrosky
Image via Jeff Wojtaszek

1.Tell us a little about yourself and your career. It’s been a whirlwind.
I started off behind the scenes at Food Network and have been working both in production and on-air for twenty years now-which sounds crazy long. But time flies when you love what you do.

2. Describe a typical work day.
There’s no typical work day. One day I may be writing for 8 hours straight in my home office, one day I might be tasting vodkas in Amsterdam and the very next I could be in hair and make up for the TODAY show. I don’t do typical and this work style suits my undiagnosed ADD perfectly.

3. Whether it’s for a TODAY show segment or for an upcoming article, can you explain your process for creating wonderful recipes, lessons, crafts, etc?
I see everything in life as an opportunity to learn, to improve my skills and my lifestyle and in turn see them as teachable moments too. I do a lot of thinking in bed. At night before I fall asleep or in the morning before I get up. It’s the only time the rest of my life is quiet around me. It can be a word in a book, something my kids say, or something I taste that inspires me. I want to make a beautiful life accessible, not daunting.

The Cocktail Club by Maureen Petrosky

4. Can you name two domestic gurus you look up to and why?
My mom and Martha. I grew up in a house with seasonal decor vignettes, beautiful tabletops and a lot of fun. I mean who else’s parents were making green eggs and ham for St. Patrick’s Day or serving pink Farina for breakfast on Valentine’s day? My mom was the original inspiration. It’s in my blood. And then of course Martha. She took it to another level that lets all of us now have parties and make a career out of it. And now with her latest collaboration with Snoop, I have to give her mad props. She keeps pushing herself and that I admire.

5. When it comes to entertaining for either small or large gatherings, do you have one expert advice to share?
Pour a drink first. It makes getting ready more fun, and that’s what it’s all about, having fun. Don’t forget that.

6. How do you mix social media when hosting or entertaining? Do share at all, and is it in real time or do you post later? 
I guess the evil of social media is a part of everything we do. I hate to miss the moment so typically I post later, after the fact. I try to document our moments but it’s more important to me to actually engage in them and be present.

7. What is your most successful form of marketing?
Getting out of the house. Really, as a creator you can spend endless days hulled up in front of your computer. It’s important to meet people face-to-face. All aspects are important, getting by-lines and being on TV are immensely successful outlets, but I get those jobs because I meet people and make connections. You will always be your best PR.

Maureen PetroskyImage via Jeff Wojtaszek

8. Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
I barely know what’s coming this year. That’s the nature of entrepreneurship. You need to be able to roll with the tide. You throw twenty ideas out there and if one sticks it’s a success. I just hope in 5 years to be happy and healthy and creating beautiful, interesting work.

9. When you’re not working what do you enjoy doing most?
Hanging out with my family, hosting happy hour, and Dragon boating.

10. Do you have any advice for those looking to enter the world of entrepreneurship?
Anyone who wants it badly enough can be their own boss. But you have to recognize if you have the personality for it, brace yourself for irregular paychecks, schedules and being on call 24/7. If you’re game for that here are a few tips: only work with people you like, spend a third of your time reaching out for new work and making new contacts, be responsive to emails and texts immediately, pick up the phone and call people- it’s much more powerful than an email, exercise and take care of yourself- you are your business card, dream big- then aim bigger- if you fall somewhere in the middle you’ll have succeeded.

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