Win two Tickets To Fashion Touchdown

“Do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life.” – Nicole Miller 

Nicole Miller, the internationally recognized designer behind the Nicole Miller fashion brand, will attend this year’s Fashion Touchdown Event to unveil her custom-made leather jacket featuring an embroidered Eagle inspired, designed to celebrate this year’s Super Bowl championship. Now in its fifth year, Fashion Touchdown raised more than $360,000 last year. Proceeds from this year’s event, scheduled for November 5, will again go toward Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence Region. Watch your favorite Eagles players walk the runway to raise money for mentoring programs!

Nicole Miller Philadelphia

Fashion Touchdown is something we look forward to all year because it blends our loves of fashion, Philadelphia and giving back to the community,” said Mary Dougherty, owner of Nicole Miller Philadelphia. “We have been honored to be involved since 2016 and are excited to showcase some surprise pieces this year.” Call Nicole Miller in Philadelphia to reserve your exclusive Eagles inspired leather jacket {also available in black} or email info@nicolemillerphiladelphia.com. Sign up to win two tickets to fashion touchdown.

Fashion Touchdown

Carroll went behind the scene at Nicole Miller for New York Fashion Week. To call New York Fashion Week a “fashion frenzy” would be an exaggeration, behind the scenes is an army of stylists and make-up artists. Nicole Miller’s Eighties club-kid-inspired Spring collection mixed nostalgia with a cool-girl vibe for a fun, wearable line as featured in WWD, Vogue Magazine, and People

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Stylate Six: Carroll

carrollStylate Six - Carroll Ivy Laurence - Social Stylate

In this series, we’ll take turns sharing six items we’re currently digging, to give you an inside look at our personal tastes while highlighting things that inspire us, motivate us, or just make us smile.

Here’s what’s currently on our co-founder, Carroll Ivy’s, radar…

La Femme Body Oil by Kindred Skincare Co.
This fast absorbing oil is illuminating, nourishing, and adds light floral notes to my skin. La Femme is my new go-to moisturizer!

Playing Tennis
…..especially on cool summer mornings on a red clay court!

Vintage Shopping
I love finding old and unique treasures to incorporate into my home and wardrobe. Especially loving these London and Paris haunts I discovered during this summer’s travels. The European vibes and memories that go with them make for an interesting and unforgettable addition to my collection.

Micro Current Facials
Also known as the ‘lunchtime lift,’ getting a micro-current facial at Chadds Ford Endermologie is one of the most relaxing parts of my week. Micro-current facials are a non-invasive option for rehydrating and smoothing skin via a low-level current that re-educates the muscles to maintain a firmer contour.

Pilates
Staying healthy and strong is very important to me, and Suzana’s pilates class at Forever Fit is a fun, challenging, and effective way to help keep me motivated. The low-impact workouts make me flexible, strong, and balanced, in both body and mind.

Macaroons
Visiting Paris was a highlight of my year and, hands down, learning to make macaroons was one of the best parts of the trip. I participated in a class that taught how to bake these delicate and decadent desserts. I could eat them every day!

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3 Email Marketing Tips

Are you a business owner who’s looking to refocus your marketing strategy? A great place to start is by creating a vibrant email presence. Email marketing is a personal and effective way to speak directly to your customers. Social media platforms, like Facebook and Instagram, are constantly changing their algorithms, so email is a great way to get right in front of your readers. Your customized message will be delivered directly to their inbox so they can refer to it whenever they want, and it won’t get lost in the mix of a busy news feed.

If you’re still on the fence, according to HubSpot, “86% of consumers would like to receive promotional emails from companies they do business with at least monthly.” If they’ve purchased something from you in the past, there’s an excellent chance they want to be a repeat customer. Give them that opportunity by creating engaging emails!

Here are a few tips to get you on your way:

1. Keep emails 90% educational and 10% promotional. You have something unique to share with your customers and they want to hear it. Focus on what you can show, tell, or teach your readers and they’ll love you even more, then throw in that quick promotional bit at the end and don’t forget a call-to-action! A great example is Kirna Zabete (see below). They show their customers what’s new in the store, feature call-to-actions (“shop new arrivals”), and include a promotion.

Email Marketing - Example Email Blast - Kirna Zabete

2. KISS- Keep It Short & Sweet. If you give your customers just a hint of what you want to share, it will make them interested in finding out what else you have to offer (like the latest fall fashion

3. Experiment! Creating dynamic material can be your make-or-break email marketing moment. Don’t be afraid to shake it up and try something new.

There’s more to email marketing than this short list, so if you’re interested in learning about the rest of our tips, contact us! We’ll chat about marketing strategies and help you to grow your business into exactly what you’ve been working towards.

P.S. Take a peek at this blog post on “The Email Blast Done Well” from 2012. These brands are still nailing it in email marketing.

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To Serif, or Not to Serif? And that’s just the beginning…

How To Choose The Right Typeface - Social Stylate

How to choose the right typeface for your project

Hello! Julia here, Social Stylate’s graphic designer, and I’m here to talk (type?) typefaces. I have been an artist since I could grip a pen, and a graphic designer since I “artfully arranged” my first tri-fold science board in grade school. Back in the day (aka the glory days of Windows 95), all I had to work with were the 20 or so preloaded Windows fonts, back when Comic Sans was fun and Papyrus was exotic. With the explosion of font availability in the form of type kits and open-source sites, the selection can be both thrilling and overwhelming. With that in mind, I wanted to share my concept/thought process when it comes to choosing a typeface for a project.

When approaching a graphic design project, one of the first questions is almost always which typeface should I use. Then the questions begin… I find that after a few basic questions I generally can find my direction:

How much type are we working with? The first question is always “how much?”. A large body of text in paragraph form has different readability considerations than an event invitation. One design principle that’s constantly scrolling through my mind as I’m designing a layout with type is “hierarchy of information.” This simply means the scale of each element (i.e. type) will dictate its importance. Scale is one of the most basic ways to control your viewer’s eye (and ensure that they see the important stuff first!). Once I know how much I’m working with, I can begin to prioritize the visual information.

Which fonts/typefaces are (possibly) required? Is there branding is being associated with this type? If it is not a standalone piece of work, then there is some creative leeway. If this is for a brand, the “rules” have already been established, and it’s the responsibility of the designer to maintain the visual continuity by using the same font family.

Who is the target audience, and what is the message? The font choice must be congruent to the messaging of the artwork. A PSA shouldn’t be cartoonish, a child’s party shouldn’t be a study in the Bauhaus School of Design. You get the picture.

Where will this be displayed? Will the work be in print, or on the web? Or both? Is the typeface setting the mood with a dramatic headline, or is it supporting beautiful artwork? It may sound a little obvious to say that readability is paramount, but it can easily be lost in translation when artwork stretches across formats and sizes.

I adore an on-trend typeface, and nowadays they are more accessible than ever. However, when it comes to typefaces, the most important thing to me is restraint. Typefaces are beautiful, and some have been around for centuries (see: Garamond, Bodoni, Grotesk), and they shine gorgeously on their own with a little breathing room. Remember, good design is invisible. Happy typing!

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